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Alaskan hunters help those who have questions HUNTERS JOHN WHIPPLE AND CASEY DINKEL pride themselves on rugged DIY-type hunting adventures that take the duo on epic trips for goats on the south shores of Kodiak or brown bears on the remote island of Unimak. Both consider themselves fortunate to live in a state that allows for such opportunities, and both want other people to experience the same joy and fulfillment they get from those hunts. “We want to reach out to people in the lower forty-eight and show them that Alaskan adventures are very doable,” says Dinkel. 60th Parallel Adventures: “Barren Ground” – Coming Fall 2015 from 60th Parallel Adventures on Vimeo. That goal is accomplished through 60th Parallel Adventures, a company the friends founded in 2014 that features entertaining and educational content put together with photos and videos on their hunts. They cover hunting costs by acting as brand…

The traditional art of tattooing DESPITE TATTOO PARLORS IN ALMOST EVERY CITY and celebrities flashing chic subcutaneous designs, facial tattoos still carry a stigma—try landing a bank job, even suited up fancily, when you look like Ray Bradbury’s Illustrated Man. In the wake of Age of Enlightenment voyages into the South Pacific, the practice reached Europe, where it has long been the domain of thugs, sailors, carnival freaks, biker gangs, and other “unsavory” folk. Some of the first New World encounters between pale faces and tattooed ones occurred along Bering Sea coastlines, during James Cook and Otto von Kotzebue’s expeditions. In Alaska, this visual language was ancient, known to Siberian Yupiit, Inupiat, Aleuts, Alutiit, Deg Hit’an, Gwich’in, Tlingit, and Haida. The earliest representation of a human face in the Arctic—a 3,600-year-old, Paleo-Eskimo carved-ivory maskette from Devon Island—has incised lines, a web of tattoos. Intrigued by fellow practitioners, expedition artists mostly…