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We’ve consulted with Kris Valencia, editor of our sister publication, The Milepost; dug up Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) statistics from the Alaska Department of Transportation; and chosen three roads from across the state that are, to borrow from “The Road Not Taken,” less traveled by. Over the course of a year, these highways, or at least significant stretches of them, average 150 cars a day or less. Locals may call these roads by other names, but we are using the names stated in The Milepost. Bear in mind, if you’ve never traveled the Nome-Teller, Taylor, or Haines Highways, you’re not alone—and you’re also missing out. Runs from Nome to Teller on the Seward Peninsula. AADT: 30 cars a day (from mile 7.1 to 70.91) What The Milepost has to say: Information about the Nome-Teller Road last appeared in The Milepost in 1981. Here’s what the Bible of North Country…

You could travel the wildest reaches of Alaska for a lifetime and not witness a scene like this—a pack of wolves feeding on a caribou kill on the edge of a rushing river. From the crest of a tundra bluff, I watched the gray alpha male tug at a hindquarter as others waited their turns. Then a female grizzly with two cubs arrived and drove the pack off. As she and one cub fed, the other hammed it up, standing on hind legs, rolling his eyes, gnawing on an antler. I sat transfixed behind my camera tripod, glued to the eyepiece, squeezing off shot after shot. It was easy to imagine that I sat alone somewhere up some far arctic valley, hundreds of miles from the nearest road. But to my right and left, crowds gathered—several busloads of people jammed against he windows, plus a half dozen professional photographers and…

Photos by Andrea D’Agosto I sat at the Talkeetna Roadhouse with three other women climbers after an attempted ascent of Denali. After two weeks of freeze-dried meals, our mouths watered in anticipation of home-cooked fare, and the aroma of freshly baked bread warmed the room. We replayed our failed summit bid of North America’s highest peak, the storm that hemmed us in and the staggering grandeur of the mountain itself. We needed a place to collect ourselves. We needed comfort food. And we were not alone. Conversations about trail conditions, hazards of wilderness travel and the weather have been taking place around tables at the Talkeetna Road- house for nearly 100 years. The Roadhouse sits on Main Street in Talkeetna, a community with an official year-round population of 876, located halfway between Anchorage and Denali National Park and accessible by road, rail and local air taxi. Founded in 1917, the…